Finding Bliss in Bali

            

When one thinks of exotic places in the world worthy of a top bucket list spot, Bali often comes to mind for many people. This tropical island in Indonesia is unlike any other place in the world, with an extremely unique culture and geography. Here you can find dreamy beaches, jungles, volcanoes, bustling urban life, and rural farming villages that seem to be stuck in an older time. It became a trendy destination due to Elizabeth Gilbert’s ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ book/movie. But for me, it has always been at the top of my “places my soul needs to visit” list because this is without a doubt one of the best places on earth for those looking for a spiritual awakening or renewal.

After visiting this past November with my perfect travel buddy, I found Bali to be a paradox in many ways. Known as an intensely spiritual and scared place, many go to Bali seeking peace and the answers to questions they’ve asked their whole lives. It is famous for a plethora of spas, yoga centers, and new age retreats. However, there are also starkly contrasting aspects, such as a crazy Vegas-esque nightlife area, extremely hectic driving, overwhelming strips lined with endless boutiques and restaurants, and a completely oversaturated market for souvenir shopping and tourist activities. Some go here for luxury and pampering, while others go for the exact opposite – to be completely humbled. It is truly a place that can offer something to anyone. Personally, I found the mix to be delightful. If I wanted to relax and connect with nature, I could. If I wanted to party, shop, or go on an adventure, I could too. And I did a little bit of everything. The options available were limitless.

The Balinese claim that Bali is the center of the universe, and therefore, extremely sacred land. The energy found here is said to be cleansing and rejuvenating for the spirit. So in many ways, this trip was a pilgrimage for me to find out for myself if this was true.

Well, I can report that all the fuss is for good reason. Bali not only earned a new fan in me, but it quickly became one of my favorite places. If you’re thinking of visiting someday, here’s some information and details on the ups and downs of my overall amazing experience and one of the best trips in my life.

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Travel Tuesdays: Machu Picchu, Peru

Machu Picchu
Photo credit: Erika Skogg, National Geographic Creative

 

One of the places at the top of my bucket list is Machu Picchu. The sacred and ancient ruins in Peru were used as a ceremonial city and astronomical observatory by the Inca civilization centuries ago. Now, Machu Picchu is one of the top tourist sites in South America and one of the most amazing archeological sites in the world. Much mystery revolves around how the temples here were built, since many of the blocks weigh as much as 50 tons each. Most people report that words simply cannot describe the beauty and that this is a MUST SEE before you die. Also, the spiritually attuned claim there is a powerful energy vortex here. Yet another reason why my soul has been calling me to visit this place one day soon!
For those also aspiring to go, the best time of year to visit is winter (between April to October). You can fly into Cusco, Peru and take a bus to the area for less than $70. However, most people recommend you take the train to Aguas Calientes and stay overnight. This will allow you to acclimate to the altitude (MANY people report severe altitude sickness here) and then make your way to the top as early as possible in the morning, since it gets extremely crowded (about 2500 tourists visit daily during high season). Private tours are recommended so you get to learn more of the fascinating history. Other tips I hear: keep your passport handy the entire time, make sure to wear good hiking shoes, and stay hydrated. Also, try to visit the Peruvian capital of Lima nearby (just a little over an hour long flight), which is a culture lover’s dream with tons to see and do.

 

 

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Giving Back, Aloha Style

Hawaiian culture is absolutely fascinating. One of my favorite things about it is that it revolves around a deep respect for and connection with the aina (land). This belief is prevalent across all indigenous cultures of the world and although most of these people have been robbed of their heritage, the concept is still sacred to them to this day. ‘O ka ha o ka ‘aina ke ola o ka po’e translates to “the breath of the land is the life of the people”. This simply means that when you take care of the land, the land takes care of you. Sustainability.

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Giving back to the aina is important, especially for me, since this aina has been so good to me. Moving to Hawaii 14 months ago has been the best thing for me and my spirit, and allowed me to truly thrive in ways I never imagined were possible. I attribute this to the mana (power) that exists here, which is known to be healing for all who encounter it.

So I was definitely excited when a friend invited me to experience a lᾱ hana (work day). For Hawaiians, this is not only an opportunity to help out the community, but it “strengthens the connection between people and land”. I was completely honored to partake and this ended up being one of the greatest experiences I’ve had here in Hawaii to date.

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